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The Central Mosque of Almaty is situated at the intersection of Pushkin street and Mametova street. It was built in 1996-1999. Authors of the project are architects S. Baimagambetov, Zh. Sharapiev, K. Zharylganov; constructor K. Tolebaev.

It is a monument of religious architecture (in accordance with the resolution of the 15th session of Almaty city Maslikhat January 23rd, 2002).

The mosque is a rectangular three-storied building measuring 76 x 50 meters. A high attic conceals the space under the roof. South-west side of the building is a five-sided mihrab with tropeic dome on the roof that shows the direction of Mecca. Corners of the mosque were built in the form of towers with semicircular domes the height of which reaches 27 meters. The main dome of the building (it is of 20 meters in diameter and it rises above 36 meters) is located on two-layer tholobate, an octagon that passes into a cylinder. It is decorated with stalactite and epigraphy (suras of the Koran) inlaid with coloured mosaic and completed with a gilded crescent. And minaret with a height of 47 meters stands close to the mosque.
Initially the domes of the mosque were paved with light blue glass-ceramic tiles. In 2010 – 2011 the domes were restored during which they had been paved with golden plates. The entrance is decorated with carved marble thin slabs.

From outside the mosque is the huge white building with domes, and inscriptions on Arabic language, taken from Koran are depicted on them. Inside the mosque is designed with luxury, but in such manner that the interior seems quite plain, and such combination of rich decoration and religious simplicity create the harmonic image of mosque.

In 2000 after complete overhaul the mosque was equipped with air conditioners, computers, furniture for reading the Koran and other conveniences.

The Central Mosque of Almaty can hold two thousand worshippers.

Official web site: http://www.azan.kz/

Phone: 397-76-02

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